Library Technology Timeline

From Clay Tablets, to Scriptoriums, to OPACs:
A chronology of the first use of a technology in a library

         
1945 - 1950
 
1960 - 1970
   
1970 - 1980
 
1980 - 1990
 
1990 - 2000
   
2000 - 2005
       
                                                           
   
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1950 - 1960
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1950
Sacramento’s Public Library tries Muzak. Muzak is played in the building on a trial basis: on for 15 min. and off for 15 min.

Source: (1950). Music in the library. Library Journal, 75, p. 937.


1950
WFPL-FM has its first broadcast on February 18, 1950. Louisville Free Public Library becomes the first public library to own and operate a radio station.

Source: Johnson, J.R. (1950). Louisville’s Radio Station is First of Its Kind. Library Journal, 75, p. 1203.


1950
Boston Public Library becomes the first public library in New England to have an Audiovisual Department.

Source: (2002). First Facts: Guides to the Library. Boston Public Library [On-line]. Available: http://www.bpl.org


1950
On September 1, 1950, the Denver Public Library launched its Drive-up Book Return so patrons could return books without having to park.

Source: (1951). Denver Public Library’s users hail easy return of books. Library Journal, 76, pp. 545-546.


1958
Marking the beginning of the Books-on-Demand program, the UMI library contains a collection of out of print books that can be reproduced on demand.

Sources: http://www.il.proquest.com/division/pub-history.shtml#1950s


1959
In September 1959 the first formal course anywhere dealing with ISR was held at UCLA. The 2-week workshop was developed and taught by two ISR pioneers, Joseph Becker and Robert M. Hayes (1926- ). Becker was then the head of the CIA Library (a library whose funding, resources, and degree of automation were the envy of many librarians in the 1950s and 1960s). His Project WALNUT has already been mentioned. After retiring from the CIA, Becker spent many years as an ISR consultant. Hayes was then the head of a research project for Magnavox Corporation aimed at developing magnetic cards whose density was remarkably high for the time, and whose purpose was to provide an easily sortable store of text and/or numeric information. Hayes later served on the faculty, and as the Dean, of the UCLA Graduate School of Library and Information Science.

Source: School of Information - The University of Texas At Ausitn, available at:
http://www.ischool.utexas.edu/~l38613dw/powerpoint/38613OverviewOfISR_Part3.ppt


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Last updated: 15 December 2004
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